Part Two

RESEARCH

BRUTALISM

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ANASTASIA LE FEY

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ANASTASIA LE FEY

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MARTIJN VAN STREIN

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MARTIJN VAN STREIN

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RICK OWENS

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RICK OWENS

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RICK OWENS

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BRUTALISM IN INDIA

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BRUTALISM IN INDIA

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BRUTALISM

Brutalism

Brutalism, also known as Brutalist architecture, is a style that emerged in the 1950s from the early-20th century modernist movement. Brutalist buildings are characterised by their massive, monolithic and ‘blocky’ appearance with a rigid geometric style and large-scale use of poured concrete. The movement began to decline in prevalence in the 1970s, having been much criticised as unwelcoming and inhuman.

The term ‘brutalism’ was coined by the British architects Alison and Peter Smithson, and popularised by the architectural historian Reyner Banham in 1954. It derives from ‘Béton brut’ (raw concrete) and was first associated in architecture with Le Corbusier, who designed the Cite Radieuse in Marseilles in the late-1940s.

Brutalism became a popular style throughout the 1960s as the austerity of the 1950s gave way to dynamism and self-confidence. It was commonly used for government projects, educational buildings such as universities, leisure and shopping centres, and high-rise bocks of flats.

Brutalism became synonymous with the socially progressive housing solutions that architectsand town planners prioritised as modern ‘streets in the sky’ urbanism. With an ethos of ‘social utopianism’, together with the influence of Constructivist architecture, it became increasingly widespread across European Communist countries such as Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia.

Brutalism was generally characterised by its rough, unfinished surfaces, unusual shapes, heavy-looking materials, straight lines, and small windows. Modular elements were often used to form masses representing specific functional zones, grouped into a unified whole. As well as concrete, other materials commonly used in Brutalist buildings included brickglasssteel, rough-hewn stone and gabions.

As the high-rise began to be discredited as a result of crime and urban decay, so Brutalismbecame increasingly reviled, and across the UK, many Brutalist buildings were demolished. However, it has continued to influence later forms such as high-tech architecture and deconstructivism. In recent years, it has started been critically reappraised, with certain buildings being seen as architectural landmarks.

 

(WIKIPEDIA)

AMBER

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BRUTALISM IN NATURE

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TEXTILE REFERENCE

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TEXTILE REFERENCE

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TEXTILE REFERENCE

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TEXTILE REFERENCE

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PUBLIC ART

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STEVEN GONTARSKI

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STEVEN GONTARSKI

Steven Gontarski (born 1972)[1] is a sculptor from Philadelphia whose work has been included in solo and group exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary ArtsKunsthalle WienWhite Cube gallery and the Groninger Museum. Gontarski is a graduate of Brown University and Goldsmiths College, University of London.[2]

In 2008, Gontarski created Ob 8, a bright red abstract sculpture which stands 5 metres high and is made of painted and lacquered glass-fibre-reinforced plastic. The organic shape of the work has been described as "recognisable but not identifiable, conjuring comparisons to many things in the real world: clouds, organs, oceans, smoke rings."[3]

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Treetop Experience in Denmark

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Collar experiment/ paper manipulation

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Public Art progress

As of this point, I have started to look into how my public art piece hides things through its form but also allows to be seen through with its gaps. Additionally, the meaning of the piece, which is to put something abstract and colourful in a very dull office area. I really like the above photos, one of a huge cone shaped structure jutting out in a forrest. This also creates a distinction in the manmade opposed to the natural. The bottom photo, where the person has manipulated the paper to create these neck pieces also contrast very well with a simple white shirt underneath. These distinctions are some that I will continue to explore. 

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Shape research

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expressive architecture

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Strap and shape research

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Strap and shape research

As I was working on my on my public art project, I started to think about trimmings and straps, researching the different ways in which straps can be used, specifically looking at bondage and leather materials. I knew I wanted to use more industrial materials such as plastic and nylon for my garment; however, the way that straps are used in bondage design are often interesting because they contour and force the body in different positions and shapes. 

Strap and shape research

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Research

I continued to research trimmings while simultaneously continuing to look at designs where large shapes jut out of hte body at unique and interesting angles. I also thought about paper manipulation and trying to see how i could incoporate fabric and paper manipulation into my designs and garments. 

trimmings research

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Research

Due to the fact that it is a public art brief, I wanted to explore some garments and research from the public sector. Specifically, I was interested in the clothing of workers in large cities during the 20s-40s, where there were huge building advances, specifically in New York City, which is where I consider my home. I liked how they had a lot of straps and harnesses keeping them safe, but still worked in a rather dangerous way to erect huge structures. It is important to see the people behind public structures and not just the final piece. 

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LANYARD RESEARCH

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LANYARD RESEARCH

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LANYARD RESEARCH

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LANYARD RESEARCH

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DENIM RESEARCH

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INWARD OUTWARD PROJECT

Social media usage

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Social media

Over the last dew days, since interviews have been over, my social media usage, especially on instagram has spiked. I've noticed the correlation between spending more time on social media and feeling way more insecure and less happy in real life. I think the effects of seeing people's "perfect lives" everyday really make people feel like their lives are no as fulfilled.

 

I've also noticed that social media can also produce a lot of unrealistically high expectations that people feel they have to live up to. The standard on a lot of social media is a capitalist, "buy, buy, buy" heteronormative outlook that forces people to feel like they should act and live in a certain way. While there's certainly an argument to say that social media is great for self expression and creativity, and while it surely can be, a lot of the things I see on social media are more inhibitive for my happiness and creativity than conducive. Even with something like relationships, when you see a ton of super healthy and loving relationships, it can quickly lead me to find fault in my own relationships. 

what i watch

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sleep

Ive had trouble sleeping recently, been watching a lot of ASMR

 

favorite asmrtists:

 

RaffyTaffyASMR

Slimwhispers

gibiASMR

Sufficient Whispers ASMR

Whispersredasmr

my netflix

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Some film/ shows I've loved

First and foremost, shameless is probably one of the greatest TV shows of all time. The rawness of the plot with the immense acting capabilities make Shameless the goat.

The get down brothers is another show I've loved and watched recently and actually inspired by denim project.

New Jake Gyllenhall movie (one of my favorite actors), although I think his capability to pick moves is weakening because this movie is really boring. It's supposed to be kind of like an action thriller horror flick but ends up being more comical than intended.

American Crime Story is also incredible, it's a true crime show made by the same people as american horror story. The first season was on OJ Simpson, which is one of stories those people that people are fascinated by. The second season, on the murder of Gianni Versace is even better.

The golden house, a fantastic novel I've been reading about a rich indian family that moves to new york city

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The golden house

This book my dad gave me for christmas. Its about a very wealthy indian man who moves to a big townhouse in new york city. it is told from the perspective of a neighbor who witnesses their arrival. It focuses on the family as many of more dark things that happen within it. Some of the things it speaks on are morality, death, art, and love. I'm really engaged with it at the moment because i myself moved to new york city from india to go to boarding school so i can really relate to the characters. 

the mountain shadow

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the mountain shadow

Another book about India, sequel to Shantaram and a longtime favorite novel of mine. 

Wishlist- an archive collection of my favorite garments by some of my favorite designers

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Restaurants I've gone too in the last week

Elan Cafe- flower themed super instagrammable (god I hate that word) cafe with a lot of pink and other pastel colors. Food was very average, I had the poached eggs, smoked salmon and avocado on sourdough and a late (20 pounds).

Canton in Chinatown- a family run yet extremely efficient Chinese restaurant in chinatown. Had peking duck for the first time, a whole bunch of super delicious dim sum (har gao, sui mai, xi long bao) along with some crispy honey chicken and tiger prawns. Other than the profuse amounts of MSG in the food, it was something I'd never experienced before.

Busaba Ethai (soho) - fairly decent thai food, I had pad thai, but overpriced for the size of the food, service was horrible too, wouldn't really reccomend.

Guanabana (kentish town)- by far one of the coolest places I've eaten at in a while. Carribean food, which I've never had before, specifically jerk chicken. Also it was byob, meaning you could bring your own alcohol which ends up being a lot cheaper than if they serve alcohol at the restaurants. 

Elan cafe

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Canton

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Busaba

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guanabana

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Artists I've been Listening to

Yung Lean

Noname

Sticky Fingers

Asap Rocky

Notorious BIG

Saba

Kid Cudi

Playboi Carti

Ecco2k

21 Savage

Lupe Fiasco

Bladeee

Earthgang

Frank Ocean

J cole

Caleborate

Mos Def

Men I trust

Big L

The Weeknd

80purpp

Lil peep

Bas

Cozz

Duke Ellington

Flav.io

Frank Ocean

Gang Starr

Herbert Grönemeyer

Jaden Smith

Kanye West

KIDS SEE GHOSTS

Loyle Carner

Mac Miller

Nujabes (GOAT)

Pink FLoyd

Rapsody

Sampha

Vince Staples

 

music videos i've been into

Music videos (one of the coolest things ever) that I've been into and watch a lot:

 

Yung Sherman- fear

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVTo3yccekg

 

Yung Lean (longtime inspiration, has come a long way since he made this but still such an important moment of my teenage years

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stgrSjynPKs

 

Asap Rocky- the kids turned out fine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUQI-o02JYU

 

Asap rocky - ASAP forever (probably my favorite video of all time, really inspired me to actually learn how to film and edit)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNzc6hG3yN4

 

Janelle Monae - Make me feel. I love the colors, the choreography, the clothing, the glam

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGRzz0oqgUE

 

Tash Sultana - just discovered this phenomenal women, she has so much raw talent and emotion in her performance and this makes the video amazing in itself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn8phH0k5HI

 

 

Hussein Chalayan (favorite designer currently)

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more of Hussein Chalayan *ss2000

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Designers I've really been into

Hussein Chalayan

Craig green

Rick Owens (as always)

Liam Johnson

Paolina Russo

 

Hussein Chalayan

Theatrical work has become something I've really been into. I still want to create wearable garments but I think it can stem from something much more interesting such as a theatrical performance. When I stumbled upon Chalayan's spring 2000 colelction I immediately fell in love with the concept, the performance and the clothes themselves. This is the type of experience and atmosphere I want to be able to create at a show, when it is more than just the garments, when it becomes a constantly changing and evolving narrative. This is what somebody will remember after they see a show, it is not my goal to reach the average person. 

My day of digital detox

What I did today on my day of digital detox (I wrote it down as I went about my day).

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Things i've been really into

When I lived in India, my dad always rode motorcycles, and I saved up and bought my first motorcycle when i was 15. It was my biggest dream and I had some really wild times riding it on the highways and crashing. Since I left india, I haven't really gotten to ride, but I've been dreaming of it a lot recently so I've been looking for some cheap used dirtbikes that I could buy - here are some of my favorite motorcycles and why.

Kawasaki kx125 - my first motorbike

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What Ive wanted for a long time - rx100

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Kawasaki kz550 cafe racer

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My fathers motorbike - Royal enfield bullet

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enfield

Royal Enfield (India)
Public
Industry Automotive
Founded 1955 as Enfield India
Headquarters Chennai, India[1][2][3]
Key people
Products List of Royal Enfield motorcycles
Production output
Increase 666,493 units (2016)[7]
Revenue Increase ₹7,037.97 crore(US$980 million) (2016)[7]
Increase ₹2,205.81 crore(US$310 million) (2016)[7]
Increase ₹1,559.94 crore(US$220 million) (2016)[7]
Parent Eicher Motors
Website Royal Enfield
 
Logo used from 1995 to early 2014
 
Bullet with plain Enfield tank badge
 
Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 350, 2004
 
Royal Enfield Classic 350, 2010 model

Royal Enfield is an Indian motorcycle manufacturing brand with the tag of "the oldest global motorcycle brand in continuous production"[8]manufactured in factories in Chennai in India. Licensed from Royal Enfield by the indigenous Indian Madras Motors, it is now a subsidiary of Eicher Motors Limited, an Indian automaker.[9] The company makes the Royal Enfield Bullet, and other single-cylinder motorcycles.[10] First produced in 1901, Royal Enfield is the oldest motorcycle brand in the world still in production, with the Bullet model enjoying the longest motorcycle production run of all time.

RE-CYCLE.ORG

I know that this is not the biggest charity, or the most well known, but since motorcycles is all I've had on my mind today, I figure i might aswell choose a charity to research that deals with motorcycles. Obviously, oil, gas, they are not sustainable, we are sucking the earth dry of it's natural resources and fuelling a global environmental catastrophe that will most likely destroy humanity, but motorcycles are fun, so instead of getting rid of them once they are broken or no longer usable, re-cycle.org ships them to repair africa, repairs them and then gives them to underprivileged communities where people have to travel large distances to get to school or to get water. It gives the motorcycle itself a new life, saves commodities and also gives many people a better way of living.

Sweccha

Our genesis lay in the year 2000 as ‘We for Yamuna’ campaign, a collective response towards growing apathy towards one of the most polluted rivers of the world. Since then the organization has gathered popular and powerful voices for the support of this cause and has emerged as the loudest and strongest voice in India on the matter.

Sweccha- Yamuna

When I was 15 and lived in Delhi, we had to do a month long research project into an environmental crisis in India, do first hand research and interview somebody from a charity. I focused mine on the river pollution in India, which is a huge crisis and honestly one of the most brutal things I've ever seen. The river is completely dead, no living things can survive in it's toxic waters, and foam from all of the chemicals bunches up on on the surface of the river. There are river divers, who look for valuable metals and other stuff at the bottom of the river, and often have very curious and unique diseases.

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Yamuna Yatra

One interesting campaign they have done has been to do a yearly hike called the Yamuna Yatra, which invites anybody who would like to join to hike for 12 days following the yamuna from its dirty city state up into the mountains to see it's origins. its forces people to interact with the river in a way that they never normally would, and to identify a gross body of water to its beautiful home. yamuna-yatra-slide.jpg

GIVE A CAR

GIVEACAR

The idea for Giveacar developed whilst I was working for three months buying and selling cars. Time and again, I came across people who were willing to accept a low price for their cars just to get rid of them quickly. Often they would miss out on hundreds of pounds, even on low priced vehicles. I quickly came to the conclusion that if this was the case with roadworthy cars, then people would have an even greater sense of urgency with scrap cars.

I created Giveacar to give people an ethical, hassle-free way of getting rid of a scrap car. At Giveacar, we know that there is value in every scrap car, and we are willing to put in the time and effort on behalf of our customers, in order to raise money for charity. In conjunction with our nationwide salvage partner, we secure the best price for our scrap metal. Roadworthy cars can be put through an auction and we receive their market value. The scrap or auction of these unwanted cars generates much-needed funds for charity.

Whilst developing the business model behind Giveacar, my research revealed that charitable car donation in the USA is extremely popular. Every year, hundreds of thousands of cars are donated, raising millions of pounds for various charities.

Yet car donation in the UK has been virtually non-existent, despite the large number of underused or unwanted cars. I created Giveacar to change this, and divert the value of these cars to fund the vital work of the many amazing charities based in the UK.

By remaining independent from any one charity, we hope to rapidly increase the overall amount raised from car donation in the UK.  Our goal is to promote the car donation in the UK so that it becomes commonplace. So far, the response from customers, charities and the scrap car metal industry has been overwhelmingly positive. We have organised the collection of over 30,000 cars, raising a six figure sum for charity.

We are motivated by our belief that we have unearthed a source of revenue that charities can use for years to come. The Giveacar model proves that car donation clearly works in the UK, and given time and visibility, our vision is of a future where the donation of your car to charity is as common as the donation of clothes to your local charity shop.

If you support our vision, please spread the word about our site and our service. If you know anyone who has a vehicle that they do not want or need, why not give them our details?

What may not seem valuable to you, will be valuable to the charity you choose to support. Lets make a difference together, one car at a time!

Tom Chance – Creator of Giveacar

Why I care

recently my father has been talking about selling his motorbikes. Delhi has one of the biggest air pollution problems in the whole world, my dad wears face-masks whenever he steps outside and has chronic cough and breathing problems due to this. He is fed up and while he has always had his dream motorbikes and his dream cars, he has decided to give that all up simply due to how incredibly pollutive they are, from the metal being mined in poor countries, to the pure amount of fuel and co2 emissions, it is simply not viable for the world to continue to create the automobile industry in the way that it does. While GIVEACAR may not be the best marketed, or the biggest charity, they do really important work helping people in a way that the world really needs. While cars are an obvious necessity for most people every day, there is a way to be considerate and caring of this industry and giveacar does a great job of that.